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Pull Me a Drink

Pull Me a Drink


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We thought we had seen it all when the wine-by-the-keg phenomenon poured its way into bars across the country, but bartenders remind us that the wonders of the spirits industry never cease. From East Coast to West, they are introducing customers to a new kind of drinking experience, ordering a straight-spirited cocktail on tap.

Kevin Diedrich, bar manager of the fairly new Jasper’s Corner Tap & Kitchen in San Francisco’s Serrano Hotel, which has only been open less then a year, says, "We’ve been doing this since we opened. People had already been doing Jameson, vermouth, and wine on draft. It was something I wanted to do to separate us from everyone else who was already doing straight-spirit on draft. I thought, why not put a cocktail on draft?"

Diedrich instinctually took the concept behind wine on draft technology and applied it to putting a cocktail on tap. He hooked up one of the six taps on the back bar to an empty stainless steel Cornelius keg, commonly used by home brewers. Pressurized nitrogen, which does not carbonate the cocktail, is used to pump the beverage from the keg to the taps. If the cocktail requires carbonation, the nitrogen is substituted with carbon dioxide.

Since its opening last summer Jasper’s Corner has been offering customers the classic Negroni on draught. Diedrich takes the recipe for a single cocktail (1 ounce gin, 1 ounce Campari, 1 ounce sweet vermouth) and translates it directly into a large format batch (4 liters of gin, 4 liters of Campari, and 4 liters of sweet vermouth). Diedrich purposely chose a straight-spirited cocktail that isn’t comprised of sugars or syrups for two reasons: "A straight-spirited cocktail will not separate, but if the mixture includes syrup then the sugar will eventually sink to the bottom. The consistency of the cocktail is completely different and the keg will have to be shaken or stirred." Secondly, he adds, "I’m filling up the keg weekly, but the shelf-life is going to be forever because one, it’s sealed, and two, it’s straight spirits so there’s nothing in there that’s going to spoil, like citrus and sugar."

Practicality isn’t the only reason behind his choice of cocktail. Diedrich shares that there is something alluring about the Negroni being an "industry-driven drink." He says, "It’s an acquired taste that takes a little time for the novice to get used to. People who order the Negroni, know the Negroni." In keeping with that insider practice, Jasper’s Corner has very recently introduced a second classic cocktail to its bar taps, the Hanky Panky (gin, sweet vermouth, and Fernet Branca) — not that you would know it by looking at the drink menu! Diedrich explains, "We like it being this underground you-need-to-know kind of thing. There isn’t a giant handle on the back bar that says Hanky Panky or Negroni. It’s kind of a cultish following that everyone knows about."

Click here to read the rest, and find out where to order a cocktail on tap.

— Vincenza Di Maggio, INSIDE F&B


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.


Screwdriver

The Screwdriver is a classic drink that has been designated an International Bartender Association official cocktail. The history of the Screwdriver is somewhat debatable, even though mention of it in literature goes back to 1949, when vodka was first gaining traction in the United States.

Some claim that the drink was first popularized by American aviators. Another origin story claims that it was made popular by American oil workers in the Persian Gulf, who would secretly dose their OJ with vodka. Supposedly, they dubbed the drink the Screwdriver because they mixed it first with a screwdriver when a spoon was not available.

Questionable origin stories aside, it’s easy to imagine drinkers building this simple, two-ingredient beverage, so it’s possible the drink appeared in multiple places around the same time. After all, the Mimosa (sparkling wine and orange juice) had already been in rotation for a couple of decades by then, and it’s not a far stretch from sparkling wine to vodka.

The beauty of the Screwdriver lies in the cocktail’s simplicity and the drink’s adoption as a morning eye-opener. Combining orange juice and vodka in a highball glass is about as easy as a cocktail gets and creates a base that’s ripe for experimentation, as witnessed by later inventions like the Harvey Wallbanger and Fuzzy Navel.

Make this version of the classic Screwdriver next time you’re hosting a brunch or just need a pick-me-up, and rediscover why this drink is an essential part of any cocktail drinker’s toolkit.