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4 Innovative Cocktail Mixers, Cubed

4 Innovative Cocktail Mixers, Cubed

See what happens when mixers get the ice, ice, baby, treatment

Maryse Chevriere

Pomerita cocktail

Freezing Bloody Mary mix into ice cubes to use in an innovative, modern take on a Bloody Mary. It's the kind of idea you can't help but look at and think, "Damn, that's clever, why didn't I come up with that?"

Consider the ingenuity. Ice — while an important and often overlooked ingredient in making cocktails — inevitably waters down your drink. The solution: Make the ice with something you actually want to melt into the drink. And for the home entertainer hosting a cocktail party, what is more appealing than mixers you can make ahead of time in bulk batches for cocktails that only take seconds to assemble? (Not to mention they're quite eye-catching).

Drawing inspiration from Randy Clemens' Bleeding Mary, here are four cocktails that turn mixers into an ice cube affair.

Pomerita

A unique take on a pomegranate margarita where lime juice and pomegranate seeds are frozen into an ice cube for stunning visual effect.

Big Bad Pickleback

The Pickleback easily ranks as one of my favorite shots, and this recipe provides a translation to cocktail form. Think of it as a new way to enjoy whiskey on the rocks.

Chocolate Cherry Russian

Taking the traditional White Russian in a new direction by making a chocolate milk and cherries ice cube. The more the cube melts, the better the cocktail gets. The Dude definitely abides.

Black & Stormy

A reworking of the classic Dark 'n' Stormy (of couse it can't legally be called one unless it's made with Gosling's rum) — this one features an impressive cube of frozen ginger beer muddled with fresh blackberries.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.


The Home Bartender’s Guide to Smoked Cocktails

A few months back Bespoke Post introduced a $70 cocktail smoking and infusion kit that seemed revolutionary … as most like-minded kits are twice the price, if not more.

Then I got one. And I promptly set it next to the $200 smoking kit (from another company) I had received as a gift from my girlfriend a year before and just let the two of them collect dust.

The problem with smoked cocktails is that while they look cool — and the idea of infusing drinks (or food) with a smoky flavor is always welcome in my house — I really didn’t know what I was doing. Somehow the idea of using a smoking gun, burning wood chips and working with a glass dome — none of which seems that difficult — seemed too much effort to add a little smack of campfire to my whiskey tipple.

But, yes, the final product is worth the small extra expense and effort. “The idea with smoke on a cocktail is to allow the flavors of the liquid and the smoke to infuse one another — the longer you let them sit with each other the more their flavors get to play,” says Dan Stern, the Head Bartender at the recently-opened NYC bar Bandits (whch makes a Cuba Libre riff called the Smoky Cokey).

To help assuage my smoking fears — and get past my procrastination — I asked a few bartenders with extensive smoked cocktails knowledge for tips.