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How to Make the Ultimate Po'Boy Slideshow

How to Make the Ultimate Po'Boy Slideshow

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It's often said that the bread makes the sandwich, and the po'boy is no exception to this rule. Ask a New Orleans native and they will likely point you to Leidenheimer, the leading baker of po'boy bread, or John Gendusa Bakery, which invented the bread used today. If you're not lucky enough to live anywhere near these bakeries, look for a wide, symmetrical French loaf without pointy ends. Chef Brian Jupiter says, "Don't use baguette and think that you are making a po'boy. [The] bread should be soft and airy with [a] slightly crisp crust." Go with locally made breads or breads baked in-house rather than mass-produced breads trucked across the country.

The Bread

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It's often said that the bread makes the sandwich, and the po'boy is no exception to this rule. [The] bread should be soft and airy with [a] slightly crisp crust." Go with locally made breads or breads baked in-house rather than mass-produced breads trucked across the country.

Don't Be Stingy

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Load that po'boy up with a generous serving of fried seafood. "Fried seafood makes the best po'boys and don't skimp on the meat!" says Jupiter. Using shrimp as an example, he says, "Places… frustrate me when they make their shrimp po'boys with only six pieces of shrimp."

How to Shuck Oysters

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1. Clean the outside of the oyster shell with a stiff brush to remove any excess dirt or mud.

2. Wrap the oyster in a towel with the hinge sticking out.

3. Insert the tip of an oyster knife near the hinge about half an inch. Make sure you use a special oyster knife instead of a regular kitchen knife for your safety.

4. Secure the oyster in the towel, and slide the knife around the lip of the oyster until you reach the other side of the hinge, keeping it as level as possible. Keep the knife inserted about half an inch and the tip pointed slightly up.

5. Twist the oyster knife to detach the muscle from the top shell.

6. Then, use the oyster knife to detach the bottom shell and to remove excess debris.

Use Cornmeal

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Cornmeal and oysters go together like salt and pepper, at least when you're frying them. Cornmeal lends a distinct flavor and a nice crunch to the oysters, and is the traditional way of preparing fried oysters for po'boys. Jupiter uses a 2:1 ratio of all-purpose flour to cornmeal in his recipe.

Season, Season, Season

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Get Dressed

Jupiter says to always get the po'boys dressed, which in po'boy-ordering vernacular means, "Always top with shredded lettuce, tomato, pickle, and mayo." Don't get tempted to cut corners here — it's important to cut the shredded lettuce from a whole head of lettuce instead of using pre-shredded bags, and we think it's folly to bother with the tomato if it's out of season.

Even Better

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Mayonnaise is a must, but if you really want to turn up the flavor factor, make remoulade sauce. Jupiter's version adds some heat with a good dose of Louisiana hot sauce.


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!


Recipe: Slow-Cooker Roast Beef Po’ Boys

Of all the delicious meals I have had the pleasure of eating in New Orleans, by far my favorite is a drippy, sloppy, saucy roast beef po’ boy. Perhaps lesser known than its fried seafood sibling, I much prefer the garlicky slow-cooked sandwich swimming in its own rich, roux-thickened gravy.

The po’ boy (or poor boy, if you will) is the reigning king of New Orleans sandwiches. Created and named during the street car strike of 1929, it can be filled with anything from potatoes to shrimp to oysters to ham, so long as it is tucked inside a loaf of soft, squishy (preferably freshly baked) French bread.

There is something about the roast beef po’ boy in particular that won me over at first bite. I mean, how can I resist chunky bits of beef melting in my mouth, its juices running down my chin and dripping on my lap? You know something is good when you couldn’t care in the least!

One thing’s for sure, everyone that’s had one (NOLA natives in particular) has a favorite type. There are a few different methods for preparing the roast beef — from thinly sliced and layered to pot-roast style (where the slow-cooked meat is shredded or chopped), and most famously (and perhaps most hard to come by) those using “debris,” which is essentially a hearty gravy made up of bits of meat and char that have fallen from the roast.

I’ve been experimenting with my version of roast beef po’ boys using the pot-roast style, essentially, for quite some time. Originally I overcomplicated things by adding all sorts of nontraditional ingredients to the mix and thinking that more add-ins meant more flavor. I’ve come back around though, with the realization that less if often best. (Bacon is one of my changes that stuck because, I mean, how could it hurt?)

Top round is my preferred cut (followed by chuck), which is then slow cooked in a flavorful sauce made up of garlic, onions, red wine, and stock. The sauce is thickened with a flour- and butter-based roux, to which the shredded meat is added back to create the ultimate gravy.

You can eat your po’ boy plain or “dressed,” which has the addition of lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, and maybe a few dill pickles. As for me, I like mine with lots of mayo and a slice of provolone cheese. If you want to truly go New Orleans style, serve with an ice cold root beer to wash it all down. And don’t forget a pile of napkins!