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Argo Tea Releases Tea Latte Drinks Called Teappuccinos

Argo Tea Releases Tea Latte Drinks Called Teappuccinos


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The tea company is getting into bottled tea lattes

The Teappuccinos come in chai, earl grey vanilla creme, and green tea strawberry creme.

Argo Tea is releasing a line of Teappuccinos: tea-based dairy beverages.

The milk-based drinks are blended with fruits, flowers, spices, and herbs from Argo’s line of loose-leaf teas. Flavors include chai with Assam black tea, ginger, cinnamon, and vanilla; Earl Grey vanilla crème infused with bergamot and sweet vanilla; and green tea strawberry crème, a Japanese green tea with notes of strawberries and vanilla.

The bottles will be sold in grocery stores for $2.99 each.

“Argo Tea is committed to delivering innovative new products like Teappuccino that meet consumer demand for great tasting healthy beverages,” Arsen Avakian, CEO of Argo Tea, said in a press release. “With a growing presence in retail stores and in new Argo Tea cafés, we’ve quickly become a one-stop shop — offering tea connoisseurs ready to drink options, loose leaf and sachets — that’s poised for continued success, both domestically and abroad.”

Argo Tea currently sells loose-leaf teas, sachets, sweetened and unsweetened bottled iced teas, teaware, and teapots. There are over 50 café locations across the country.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


California Tea & Coffee Brewery

As usual, my post for www.tching.com this month will be a more extensive coverage of a topic I touch on here as a prelude. This month it has to do with letting passion for your product or craft override simple and basic politeness.

If anyone is passionate about product, it’s yours truly. So when a new vendor came into my store unannounced and told me I could not submit a second order without doing things exactly to their specifications, I was a little..well..shocked…considering the first order had quickly sold through and people loved it. If anyone respects wanting their product to be seen at its’ best, we do, but when the product leaves your hands and the money has been exchanged…you own it. In this case, we had taken the time to source the product, tested it via samples, been set up as a customer and, during that entire process, absolutely no requirements on preparation or equipment were so much as hinted at.

That aside, there would have been a more polite way to handle the situation. So, after spending time attempting to ameliorate the situation with the rep and, when that got nowhere, the national sales manager, I now have an email in to the owner of the company, explaining in detail what happened and asking for a solution or common grounds meeting place. If this elicits nothing or the same type of response–as great as this product is–there is no way to do business in a professional manner with a company run this way.

However, it has made me re-examine my own passion for product and whether or not we are as polite as we should be about the customer’s decisions on how to use or prepare what they buy from us. My mentor used to say that, once she gave a gift, she had no right to input in what was done with it. I can’t imagine a bakery vendor telling a store owner they had to display the wares on silver trays with silver framed placards describing the delicacy or they could not reorder.

Bottomline: there’s passion…and then there’s arrogance. One is a virtue, the other is not. May we have the discernment to know which is which. I’m preaching to me. Passionate…but politely so.


Watch the video: TEA BLACK u0026 HERBAL. Нужно бооольше чая: (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. F'enton

    And what in that case is it necessary to do?

  2. Malakora

    I'm sorry, but I think you are making a mistake. Email me at PM.

  3. Faehn

    Yes, it's decided.

  4. Guktilar

    it was interesting to read you, thanks and good luck!

  5. Tausho

    I absolutely agree with you. There's something about that, and it's a great idea. I am ready to support you.

  6. Abdul-Salam

    In it something is. Thanks for the information, can, I too can help you something?

  7. Janne

    I hope, you will come to the correct decision. Do not despair.



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