New recipes

JetBlue Opened an Urban Farm Outside JFK Airport’s Terminal 5

JetBlue Opened an Urban Farm Outside JFK Airport’s Terminal 5

The farm grows blue potatoes, herbs, and other produce

Eventually, Terra Chips, one of the airline's partners in the enterprise, plans to use the blue potatoes it grows to make chips for JetBlue flights.

The JetBlue terminal at New York City’s John F. Kennedy Airport is home to a 24,000-square-foot urban farm called T5 Farm.

The blue-potato farm and garden is located outside the airport’s Terminal 5, JetBlue's home — hence the name T5 Farm. It was launched in collaboration with GrowNYC, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and potato chip company Terra Chips.

JetBlue will be able to annually grow about 1,000 pounds of blue potatoes, 2,000 different herbs, and other produce such as beets and arugula.

“An airport seems like an unexpected place for a farming experiment, but what better way to explore our role in the food cycle than to harvest right in our own back yard at JFK,” Sophia Mendelsohn, JetBlue’s head of sustainability, said in a statement.

JetBlue hopes that once the blue potatoes grow, Terra Chips can use them to make chips served in-flight. The farm is not open to the public yet, but it will be used for educational programs and farming workshops for students.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.


Empowering Communities to Feed Themselves in the Time of COVID-19

On a morning in early April, a line of people snaked around a Bronx city block. Normally a bustling borough, the area, on this day, was subdued, as most residents heeded the government advice to stay home to stop the spread of COVID19. And yet some 3,000 senior citizens — the majority of them nervous, wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from their line neighbors — found their fear of the contagious illness trumped by a more immediate human need: hunger. Their queue stretched more than a mile as they waited next to their shopping carts for a city councilman to arrive with the pantry staples he had promised to distribute.