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Seafood Adventures Across the Globe

Seafood Adventures Across the Globe

Whether it’s a dozen Fanny Bay oysters or a 3-pound lobster, seafood lovers are particular about their own particular favorites — and think nothing of going great distances to enjoy them. But for those extra-avid eaters, here’s a roundup of singular experiences that go beyond merely a fine meal, and create a whole adventure around the eventual mouthwatering prize.

Click here to see the Seafood Adventures Across the Globe Slideshow.

— Lena Katz, JustLuxe

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The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."


The cicadas are back, and with them a warning from the Food and Drug Administration: Don't eat these critters if you have a seafood allergy.

"Yep! We have to say it! Don't eat #cicadas if you're allergic to seafood as these insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the agency tweeted Wednesday.

Since the cicadas have emerged, recipes have popped up across the internet, as some describe the critters as a rare gourmet treat.

Fish and shellfish are two of the eight major food allergens that must be labeled on food packaging, according to the FDA, along with milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybean. Together, these allergens account for 90 percent of food allergies in the U.S.

Allergies related to eating insects, however, need more study, according to a recent report by the Food Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. The report, which focused on the safety of eating insects, noted that "individuals already allergic to crustaceans are particularly vulnerable to developing allergic reactions to edible insects, due to allergen cross-reactivity."