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Almond Milk in 28 States Recalled for Containing Actual Milk

Almond Milk in 28 States Recalled for Containing Actual Milk

One person has already reported an allergic reaction.

More than 145,000 half-gallons of the popular Blue Diamond Vanilla Almond Breeze nut milk, manufactured by HP Hood LLC, have been voluntarily recalled from 28 states because the product accidentally contains actual milk, according to a statement released by the manufacturer.

Milk is considered an allergen, and needs to be listed on all products that contain it, as some people can have severe reactions. As of Thursday, one person has reported an allergic reaction, though no one has had to be hospitalized, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

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The affected milk alternative is found in the refrigerated section, and has a use-by date of September 2, 2018. Shelf-stable varieties are not, at this point, part of the recall. Products are being recalled from the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Should you have an affected half-gallon, federal agencies are asking you to return it to the store where you purchased it for a full refund, or contact Blue Diamond at bluediamond.com or by phone at 1-800-400-1522.

Here's more information about food recalls:

We will update this story with more information as it becomes available.


140,000 Cartons of Blue Diamond Almond Milk Recalled for Containing Actual Milk

The company announced the recall of 145,254 half-gallon cartons of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almond milk shipped to 28 states.

Blue Diamond almond company has voluntarily recalled cartons of almond milk after realizing the product may contain trace amounts of dairy milk, which is an allergen not listed on the label, the Food and Drug Administration has announced.

HP Hood LLC, Blue Diamond’s parent company, announced on their website the recall of 145,254 half-gallon cartons of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almond milk shipped to 28 states. According to the statement, products were shipped to and later recalled from retailers and wholesalers in Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

The FDA warns that people who have a severe sensitivity or allergy to milk “run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products,” but acknowledges the product is otherwise safe to consume if you don’t have a reaction to milk. So far, one person has reported an allergic reaction, but medical treatment or hospitalization was not required.

WATCH THIS: Sony Pictures Apologizes for Insensitive Food Allergy Scene in ‘Peter Rabbit’

According to Blue Diamond’s site, only cartons with a September 2 use-by date and UPC code 41570 05621 were affected, and the recalled items represent less than 0.8 percent of half-gallon containers of the product shipped by Hood in the last year.

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Customers who purchased a milk carton affected by the recall are eligible for a refund or exchange at the retailer where they bought it or they can fill out a form on Blue Diamond’s website to receive a replacement coupon.


Almond milk recalled: what should you do?

Well, the bottom line is: if you know you have a carton of half-gallon Almond Breeze in the refrigerator, check the carton. The ones recalled were of the Vanilla Almond Breeze variety. And the tainted batch should have a use-by date of September 2, 2018. Also check for a Universal Product Code of 41570 05621 printed on the side of the carton, near the nutritional facts.

The good news is that you can return the carton to the store you bought it from and get a full refund. “We have done a comprehensive review into the situation and we’ve made corrective actions and made changes to our process to ensure that this will never happen again,” Ms. Bohan said.


Vanilla Almond Breeze is being recalled because the almond milk may contain actual milk

Some Almond Breeze products are being recalled over concerns that the almondmilk contains actual milk.

On Thursday, parent company HP Hood LC issued a recall on more than 145,000 half-gallon cartons of Vanilla Almond Breeze almondmilk because the drink may contain milk.

"People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products," the company said in a statement.

There has so far been one reported allergic reaction, according to Hood. The affected products have been shipped to retailers in 28 states and have a use-by date of September 2, 2018.

If you bought a recalled half-gallon of Almond Breeze, you can return the almondmilk to the store where you purchased it for a full refund or exchange. Or, you can visit the brand's website to complete a form to receive a refund. The website also has more info on how to figure out if your half-gallon of Almond Breeze is included in the recall.

Almond milk has been under fire recently, precisely because it doesn't contain dairy milk. The Dairy Pride Act was introduced in Congress in January, and it attempts to prevent companies that produce plant-based alternatives to dairy products from using terms like milk, cheese, or yogurt.

"The Dairy Pride Act argues that labeling plant-based products as 'milk' could be misleading to consumers, since those products do not contain the same nutritional content as real dairy," Business Insider's Leanna Garfield reported earlier this year. "Critics of the Dairy Pride Act, however, say that shoppers know exactly what they're buying if they pick up, say, a carton of Silk soy milk."


Almond Milk in 28 States Recalled for Containing Actual Milk

More than 145,000 half-gallons of the popular Blue Diamond Vanilla Almond Breeze nut milk, manufactured by HP Hood LLC, have been voluntarily recalled from 28 states because the product accidentally contains actual milk, according to a statement released by the manufacturer.

Milk is considered an allergen, and needs to be listed on all products that contain it, as some people can have severe reactions. As of Thursday, one person has reported an allergic reaction, though no one has had to be hospitalized, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

The affected milk alternative is found in the refrigerated section, and has a use-by date of September 2, 2018. Shelf-stable varieties are not, at this point, part of the recall. Products are being recalled from the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Should you have an affected half-gallon, federal agencies are asking you to return it to the store where you purchased it for a full refund, or contact Blue Diamond at bluediamond.com or by phone at 1-800-400-1522.

Here’s more information about food recalls:

  • Why You Should Never Shrug Off a National Recall
  • What Food Recalls Mean, and What You Should Do
  • Why the FDA is Looking to Overhaul the Recall System

Alternative milks have been in the news recently as the FDA is considering restricting the word “milk” to only products that contain actual animal milk. There are many different milk alternatives, made out of everything from almonds to oats, which has been a boon to vegans and those with dairy allergies, though they have vastly different nutritional values.


So, when we heard that the Almond Breeze brand of almond milk was being recalled for containing dairy, we were a little shocked.

Sure, if you drink almond milk because you prefer the taste and health benefits, you may be mildly upset. But what if you actually couldn’t have dairy?? Now it becomes a serious issue.

If you have severe (or really any) milk sensitivities or allergies, make sure you are up-to-date with the facts before you head to the grocery store.

Though, so far only the vanilla-flavored almond milk has been compromised, to avoid any risk, it may be wise to avoid the entire brand for a bit.

That’s a pretty large group of people, especially here locally in the DMV!

So far, several thousand cartons of Almond Breeze vanilla-flavored almond milk have already been recalled, and there may be more recalls in the future.

Courtesy of businessinsider.com

Have you recently bought Almond Breeze? If you have or usually do, get more information here.


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Popular almond milk recalled because it might contain actual milk-milk

A popular brand of almond milk was recalled Thursday after its maker realized actual milk may be in more than 140,000 cartons, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced.

HP Hood LLC has recalled 145,254 half-gallon cartons of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almond milk that were sent to retailers and wholesalers in 28 states, including New Jersey.

"People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products," the FDA said in a release.

There has been one report of an allergic reaction as of Thursday, but the person who drank the almond milk did not need medical treatment, according to the FDA.

The recall only applies to refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almond milk with a use-by date of September 2, 2018. .

People who bought the almond milk can return it to the store for a refund or exchange.


Cartons of Almond Breeze Milk Recalled for Possibly Containing Actual Milk

HP Hood, the maker of Almond Breeze almond milk, is recalling more than 145,000 cartons of its vanilla-flavored beverage because the product may contain actual dairy milk, the Daily Herald reports.

Any product that does not explicitly state that it contains an allergen—in this case, milk—is subject to recall. In fact, undeclared allergens are the most common reason given for food recalls in the U.S. The almond milk, which was shipped to stores in 28 states, could potentially pose a danger to people who have dairy allergies or are lactose intolerant. Otherwise, it’s safe to consume, according to the FDA.

The only products affected are Almond Breeze's refrigerated vanilla almond milk cartons with a use-by date of September 2 and a Universal Product Code of 41570 0562 on the side of the carton.

Consumers who have already purchased the affected product may return it for a full refund by filling out a form on Blue Diamond’s website.


US FDA Announces Almond Milk Recall After Contamination With Actual Dairy Milk

In the decades-long war over milk — with purveyors of cow juice on one side and the people who make an increasing array of ecru-colored plant- and nut-based drinks on the other — this is as close to consorting with the enemy as it gets.

The manufacturer of a popular brand of almond milk has announced a recall for what some would say sacrilegious act: Somehow, cow's milk got into their almond milk.

The recall affects nearly 150,000 half-gallon cartons of Almond Breeze almond milk shipped to wholesalers in 28 states, according to the Food and Drug Administration. That is less than 1 percent of all the refrigerated almond milk shipped by HP Hood in the past month.

HP Hood is a national dairy company based in Lynnfield, Mass. Among its brands are Lactaid and Crowley. But the company also handles the production of Almond Breeze, the brand of Blue Diamond Growers, a California almond cooperative.

This revelation could be more than enough to sour fans' perception of the Almond Breeze brand, whose carton features almonds plopping into a sea of pure white liquid.

It was a perception carefully cultivated by Blue Diamond Growers, whose website features a picture of a single perfect almond sitting upright on a wooden table and another photo of a farmer meticulously inspecting a blossoming almond tree.

If the photos weren't enough, the text near the top of the page proudly proclaims: "Almonds are all we do."

But a statement from Hood about the mix-up conjures a different image. The almond milk, after all, was produced in a factory — one that, almond drinkers now know, was essentially playing both sides in the milk wars.

"Although the almond milk is processed on a separate line and filler and we confirmed that the allergen control protocol all standard validation testing was conducted in accordance with our allergen control program, this particular batch of almond milk was contaminated with one container of milk through an employee error," a representative said in an email to CBS News.

"Hood made the decision to recall all of the product from this batch as a precaution."

One person with a lactose allergy was sickened by the almond milk, but Hood said the product is completely safe to drink for anyone without that allergy.

For many, it was another salvo in the greater debate over what is and isn't "milk," with billions in revenue at stake.

Is the dairy industry trying to get back at us by poisoning our almond milk with dairy.

— Victoria Ⓥ (@veggvictoria) August 3, 2018

Blue Diamond almond milk has been recalled, because the product did not contain only almonds and water, but also real dairy milk. Ironic, for the first time their product deserves the name almond MILK, and what do they do, recall it.

— Frank Mitloehner (@GHGGuru) August 3, 2018

People who ship the mammary secretions of cows argue that people who sell hemp, nut and soy-based drinks are using the centuries-old good name of milk to market products that should more appropriately be labeled soy juice or hemp drink.

In 2000 and 2010, the National Milk Producers Federation wrote the FDA to argue for a more exclusive use of the word "milk" on labels. At the time, federation spokesman Christopher Galen told USA Today, "We had to do something," which included creating a Facebook page: "They Don't Got Milk."

Last month, the FDA said it planned to start heavily enforcing a regulation that says the only products companies can call "milk" are things that come from the "milking of one or more healthy cows."

In a statement at the Politico Pro Summit, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb summed it up this way: "An almond doesn't lactate."

The debate has also entered the halls of Congress. Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) submitted an amendment to kill spending for the required FDA study that would look at relabeling, according to Roll Call, but it was defeated. Afterward, the National Milk Producers Federation declared a small victory.

"Today's vote should send a very strong message to food marketers who have long been ignoring FDA's food labeling standards by inappropriately using dairy terms on products that do not contain any dairy," the federation said. "Those days are numbered."

The other side argues that no consumer believes that when she buys, say, almond milk, that it originated from a cow.

Declining sales of cow's milk and the exploding market for alternatives is not due to the labelling on the carton, they argue, but rather what's inside it. Increasingly health-conscious consumers view milk alternatives as simply better for them.

Nancy Chapman, executive director of the Soyfoods Association of North America, told The Washington Post in 2016 that her organization has conducted studies of shoppers and found that the "overwhelming majority" — 98 percent — don't confuse it with cow's milk.

"Folks are selecting soy milk because they know it's not from dairy," she said.

2018 © The Washington Post

This article was originally published by The Washington Post.